An array is a collection of items stored at contiguous memory locations.The idea is to store multiple items of the same type together. This makes it easier to calculate the position of each element by simply adding an offset to a base value, i.e., the memory location of the first element of the array (generally denoted by the name of the array).
The base value is index 0 and the difference between the two indexes is the offset. For simplicity, we can think of an array as a fleet of stairs where on each step is placed a value (let’s say one of your friends). Here, you can identify the location of any of your friends by simply knowing the count of the step they are on.
In C language, array has a fixed size meaning once the size is given to it, it cannot be changed i.e. you can’t shrink it neither can you expand it. The reason was that for expanding, if we change the size we can’t be sure ( it’s not possible every time) that we get the next memory location to us as free.
In C language, array has a fixed size meaning once the size is given to it, it cannot be changed i.e. you can’t shrink it neither can you expand it. The reason was that for expanding, if we change the size we can’t be sure ( it’s not possible every time) that we get the next memory location to us as free.

Types of indexing in an array:
0 (zero-based indexing)
1 (one-based indexing)
n (n-based indexing)
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